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- By Gio Lester I recently attended the webinar Intro to iPad: Basic Applications for the Legal Field organized by Veritext, a court reporting company, as far as I knew. My view of court reporting companies was extremely narrow, I now know. The breadth of services they...

This is our first double feature in preparation for two important upcoming events. Enjoy! [vc_row][vc_column width='1/2'] T Minus 14 Days: Are you ready? -By Susan Cruz, CFP®, NAJIT Administrator With NAJIT’s Annual Conference only 14 days away, HQ wanted to share some of the excellent things in store for...

Dear Readers, we are in the process of changing our platform and that has had an unexpected impact on our comments feature. We love to hear from you, therefore you are invited to make yourself heard via email to tno_editor@najit.org or NAJIT's Facebook group.
After I wrote that, I realized that “how not to ask for repetitions” could be taken two ways, so I’d like to address both of them.

Part I: How Not to Need Repetitions.

1. Practice your active listening skills. 2. Train yourself to understand different accents (in both your working languages). 3. Buy sound-enhancing equipment for yourself, so you can hear better. 4. Understand the law, case law, and court processes so you can make a good educated guess at something you aren’t sure if you heard or not. (For example, memorizing possible sentences associated with certain crimes.) 5. Learn to talk faster. I suggest tongue twisters and shadowing the news. 6. Work on the Stare of Death you can give the chatterbox who’s standing behind you (not a party to the case). 7. Practice gestures and body language that will help you control the flow of witness testimony so you don’t forget long segments … 8. … but also strengthen your short-term memory and note-taking skills so you can remember longer segments.

This is a republishing with an update. Enjoy. - by Gio Lester ©2013 - I teach the introductory module on legal translation for a Brazilian translation, interpreting and language school. It’s an online course and my students are spread all over the world: Estonia, Belgium, the US,...

Maybe it was spring fever, but I don’t think so. I definitely felt what I can only describe as a breath of fresh air during the 34th NAJIT Annual Conference May 17-19, 2013,  in St. Louis, Missouri. So often nowadays I hear interpreters talk about the “graying”...

“We need more pay for the work we do.”  “Nobody respects us interpreters.”  “Can we please stop having intruders in this profession?”[1]  “When will people understand that being bilingual doesn’t mean you can interpret?”  “We should boycott if they try to bring in video interpreting.”  “Maybe conference interpreters can demand...

Last year, InterpretAmerica published a document titled “Best Practices in the Interpreting Profession: Simultaneous Interpreting in Non-Conference Settings[1]” which I co-authored. Last month, we completed a draft document titled “Best Practices in the Interpreting Profession: The Professional Medical Interpreter”. Last night I interpreted for a local school...

Mr. Microphone, or “Mike” for short, has been in my life for only the past seven years. Our relationship got off to a rough start, because I didn’t think I needed him so people could hear my interpreting. Prior to meeting Mike, I had worked...

Warning: trick question ahead! What is the best mode for interpreting witness testimony? If you said “Consecutive, of course,” then I disagree. And if you said “Um, simultaneous, maybe?” then I disagree even more strongly. (See, I told you it was a trick question.) What interpreters...

By Barry Slaugther Olsen, Co-President, InterpretAmerica The word “technology” means different things to different people.  But when it comes to interpreters, the “T” word tends to conjure up all sorts of largely unfounded fear and denial. “Will I be replaced by a computer?” or “Oh, a computer...