By Gio Lester © 2017 One of the reasons we love what we do is the impact it has on other people’s lives. We work to feed our passion for learning and helping others while we also put food on the table. Maybe the order should...

This article by Janis Palma was first published two years ago, almost to the date. It is a good reminder of the importance of proper terminology and the traps we face in our work - both translators and interpreters!
©Janis Palma- 2014
Beware of false friends! I don’t mean the people, I mean the words. 
One of the first impulses a young interpreter must overcome is the use of words that may, at first glance, seem to be equivalent terms and concepts in two languages... but are not. Taking that direct path from similarly-sounding words in our source and target languages is not always wrong, but part of being a good interpreter is knowing exactly when to take this path and when not to. In the rapid pace of judiciary interpreting, our brains may lean heavily towards cognates in source and target languages. Cognates are words with a common origin or etymology. True cognates, like “library” and “librería” in Spanish or “livraria” in Portuguese, with a common Latin root -- liber -- may come to have new and different meanings with usage and the passage of time. In this example “library” is a place where books are kept for people to read or borrow, whereas “librería” or “livraria” is a place where books are sold. So although they may be true cognates, these words have become false friends, or faux amis.

Okay, perhaps it’s a bit far-fetched to compare a courthouse to Shakespeare’s famous rose, but I have to admit that after months away from court (or, should I say,  du palais de justice…our francophone neighbors certainly have a way with words, don’t they?!) when I...

or How to Forget About Interpreting and Just Listen - By Athena Matilsky© You know how the saying goes: The only thing we have to fear is fear itself. I’m sure you have heard it; we all have. But have you heard the saying for interpreters? No?...

This article by Janis Palma was originally published on Aug 22, 2011. Janis gives us some insights into her rituals and encourages us to look into our own behavior. Enjoy!   - by Janis Palma © 2011 [blockquote text="I have just realized that with my rituals I...

The problem with court interpreting is that it’s messy. Heck, life is messy, and court interpreting is just a manifestation of our daily struggle with chaos. Allow me to explain. For months now I have been mentoring students to study for their tests; notably I’ve been coaching...

This article by Jennifer de la Cruz was originally published in August 2014. We thought it was especially relevant after Athena's piece on sight translation. This is a new aspect of what we do in court interpreting. When Facebook and Instagram and even text messaging were...

This week we welcome Javier Aparisi as a guest author sharing his findings on a personal quest. Below is Part I of Javier's journey into Brazilian jury trials. Photo credit: Valter Campanato, Agência Brasil [agenciabrasil.ebc.com.br] By Javier Aparisi ©2016 [caption id="attachment_18061" align="alignleft" width="218"] Ministry of Justice entrance, Brasilia,...