• All
  • Immigration

 Below is an anonymized compilation of comments received by The NAJIT Observer in response to Bethany Korp’s blog post “What I Wish They Knew,” published November 25, 2016.  Thank you to all who responded! I wish that everyone… … understood the function of interpreters and respected...

            I find that there are two types of people in this world: Those who find interpreting to be awe-inspiring, and those who think it’s as simple as opening up Google Translate. Usually the ones who think it is simple haven’t actually tried it. I’m pretty sure I...

This post was originally published on August 2, 2013. It remains just as relevant. Enjoy. We humans are biologically programmed to walk into a situation and immediately start to assess it, right? In fact, what we see around us will often dictate how we conduct ourselves...

Have you ever met the interpreter who knew everything? I have. Well, not really. As a matter of fact, it’s not possible to have met such an interpreter, because nobody knows everything. That is the sad reality of being human. But I have most assuredly...

-Formally known as the Executive Office for Immigration Review, or EOIR Why, indeed? Everyone knows: the work is challenging and intense. I thought that once I got state certified, which I achieved in August of last year, I’d shift from immigration work to what I perceived...

Originally published in January 2015, this post remains relevant. Please enjoy. On this blog, we dedicate a great deal of time and effort to the profession of interpreting for the courts. We tell stories, share experiences, propose new ideas, and issue calls to action. This week,...

A New Year's Resolution. I do not believe in New Year’s resolutions, but I did make a few for 2018, all related to my professional development. One of them was to take the Florida Courts’ Written Exam, a must to become a certified court interpreter in...

- By Gio Lester © 2016 Living in Miami, Florida, a bilingual city for sure, one thing we notice is that every other attorney speaks another language. Most of them have studied Spanish or their families are from one of the myriad Spanish-speaking Latin American countries, or...

This post was originally published in February 2015. But its subject matter is timeless. We hope you enjoy it. Thank goodness for words like “judge”. Juez just rolls off the tongue so nicely. I can say it in French with no problem at all, and assuming...