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This article was originally posted on November 15, 2012. Some social media tools have added features, others have lost their appeal.  As ephemeral as some of its elements are, social media is here to stay. Got something to add? Use the comments area below. By Gio...

This article by Jennifer de la Cruz was originally published in August 2014. We thought it was especially relevant after Athena's piece on sight translation. This is a new aspect of what we do in court interpreting. When Facebook and Instagram and even text messaging were...

As 2013 comes to a close, we all who have participated actively in keeping the blog current, appealing and meaningful are asked to share our feelings and lessons learned. We believe that sharing is closely related to learning and a very important part of the...

“We need more pay for the work we do.”  “Nobody respects us interpreters.”  “Can we please stop having intruders in this profession?”[1]  “When will people understand that being bilingual doesn’t mean you can interpret?”  “We should boycott if they try to bring in video interpreting.”  “Maybe conference interpreters can demand...

We grew up hearing that first impressions are lasting. The internet has redefined the meaning of “lasting” in that sentence, and social media added one more characteristic to it, “pervasive.” In the 21 st Century most of the people you will ever deal with will...

By Barry Slaugther Olsen, Co-President, InterpretAmerica The word “technology” means different things to different people.  But when it comes to interpreters, the “T” word tends to conjure up all sorts of largely unfounded fear and denial. “Will I be replaced by a computer?” or “Oh, a computer...