• All
  • Advocacy
  • ASL
  • Attorney Education
  • Business Practices
  • Certification
  • Community
  • Community Interpreting
  • Conference Interpreting
  • Continuing Education
  • Court Interpreting
  • Equipment
  • Ethics
  • Fiction
  • Finances
  • Idioms
  • Interpreters
  • Interpreting
  • Language
  • Language Associations
  • Leadership
  • LOTS
  • Medical Interpreting
  • Mentoring
  • NAJIT Academy
  • NAJIT Affairs
  • NAJIT Conference
  • New Ideas
  • Nutrition
  • Odds & Ends
  • Past Posts
  • Personal Growth
  • Professional Development
  • Professional Hazard
  • Professional Practices
  • Recent Posts
  • Remote Interpreting
  • Self care
  • Technology
  • Terminology
  • The Profession
  • Tools of the trade
  • TRAINING
  • Translation
  • Uncategorized
  • Volunteer

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_empty_space height="50px"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_single_image image="28622" img_size="full" alignment="center" qode_css_animation=""][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]The views and opinions expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official position of NAJIT.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_zigzag][/vc_column][/vc_row]...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_empty_space height="50px"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="28457" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="3/4"][vc_column_text]

By Hailu Gtsadek

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="28506" img_size="300x250" alignment="right" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="28507" img_size="300x250" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]If you were a professional race car driver, your chances of winning would be determined by multiple factors.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]You would have the luxury of an auto-manufacturer backing you up and providing you with a team to help achieve the fastest speed possible. Your team would ensure that the vehicle is optimized to perform at the highest speed it could go, making sure the engine and tires are in great condition. Not only would you need to have the best performing vehicle, but also familiarity with the track. You would spend days examining the track and preparing yourself for the curves and bumps that you may encounter. Weather conditions, mental capacity, and physical health all go into your ability to perform as well.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]But at the end of the day, speed is what makes or breaks a champion.
[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="16346" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text]

By Arianna M. Aguilar

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]Many new court interpreters have trepidation to work in court; they feel intimidated by the setting and the protocol. Unfortunately, some of the fears new interpreters have are caused by the media and its depiction of court.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]Shows like CSI or Law and Order are sometimes the only interactions a lay person has with the court system. As a result, people have many misconceptions about the court setting and the legal system.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]I would like to point out some of these misconceptions.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="1/3"][blockquote text="Shows like CSI or Law and Order are sometimes the only interactions a lay person has with the court system. As a result, people have many misconceptions about the court setting and the legal system." show_quote_icon="yes" text_color="#1b3b62" quote_icon_color="#1b3b62"][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="2/3"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text] 1. Police officers and detectives are routinely shot at, kidnapped or injured on the job.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]The truth is, sustaining some of the injuries that TV characters suffer would be the end of their police career. One such injury that I remember is Detective Elliot Stabler from Law and Order SVU is when he was shot at and blinded, but of course he bounced back very quickly and regained his sight. If this happened in real life, most likely he would not regain his sight and would go on Workman’s Compensation.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]Another incident was the kidnapping and near rape of Detective Olivia Benson from Law and Order SVU. According to the storyline, she is kidnapped by a serial killer and rapist that had been stalking her. Again, something that traumatic would likely spell the end of any police career.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]2. Police officers and other court officials speak a multitude of languages and serve as interpreters.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]To mention Olivia Benson again, during the show she is shown to be proficient in Spanish, Italian, Russian and French. This is completely unrealistic, and the show doesn’t even address how she learned those languages. During the show other staff members serve as interpreters as needed. One episode featured a court psychologist interpreting for a victim in court. In real life, court interpreters are required to be neutral and impartial. It would be a conflict of interest for a court psychologist to also be an interpreter, and he or she would not be a neutral party. The reality is that court systems across the country require the use of certified interpreters; this is a regular occurrence in metropolitan areas. The crime shows, except for the above cases, hardly ever showcase the use of the interpreter in court. Considering that these shows are based in highly populated cities, it would be reasonable to assume that they would periodically need the services of an interpreter. But somehow, all of the victims and defendants on the witness stand speak English, some with a heavy accent, but with perfect grammar. Totally unrealistic.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]
[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_empty_space height="50px"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="28296" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="3/4"][vc_column_text]

By Janis Palma

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner][vc_column_text] Simultaneous interpreting makes people say, “I don’t know how you can do that!” But a good consecutive makes people think, “I could never do that!” Consecutive interpreting is a public performance and shows the world that bilingual competence does not equate efficient interpretation. The key to a good consecutive is short-term memory, and we know short-term memory is limited, so good retention is a skill we all need to improve. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text] Technology has provided a few tools for interpreters to work around the need to develop retention skills by replacing consecutive with simultaneous interpreting of recordings. It certainly gets the job done. However, professionals may consider it cheating. In any event, interpreters are losing their consecutive interpretation skills due to this reliance on tech toys. Without them, they may end up interpreting every five words and sounding like an amateur. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text] Professional interpreters should be able to master all three basic skills: sight translation, simultaneous and consecutive interpreting. To get more mileage out of your short-term memory, maybe these tips will help you rely on your own skills rather than some external device.
[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="28465" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text]

By Salua Kamerow

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]In my free time—which is almost 80% of my time—I travel. I record all my journeys in a tiny notebook designed to remind me what to look for when I am out and about in a new place. Afterwards, I sell my stories. It may sound crazy but when visiting a new place, I become so thrilled that I forget about the points I want to write about, and when I return home, I am regretful if I missed specifics. In any case, I have a name for that little notebook—Beetlejuice—because it tends to show up when I call its name three times.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]I plan my destinations with the same precision with which I plan the content of my articles. Last month, for example, I visited Ireland, a true emerald island. Since I identify myself as a culture learner and language lover, I chose this country because of its almost-forgotten language, Gaelic. By the way, if you are wondering whether I am well-versed in this Celtic language, I am not. I was curious to learn about why it is becoming extinct and if it was indeed not publicly spoken.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]Most of Northern Ireland does not recognize Irish (which is what they call Gaelic) as their main language, which is partly due to the overwhelming influence of England’s invasion. Additionally, England imposed the use of the English language on the Irish, and the pound as currency. Nowadays, however, a third of the elder population of Ireland is fluent in Gaelic, and only the euro circulates in their economy.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"]
[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_empty_space height="50px"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="28292" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="3/4"][vc_column_text]

By Aimee Benavides

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]COVID-19 has brought a lot of things to the surface that seemed marginal before, and the future of interpreting and our ability to adapt has been tested. Right now, we are facing an unprecedented situation of forced inactivity which has very little to do with our skills, our marketing ability, or our experience as interpreters. I dare say it seems as though we’ve had to make 10 years of progress in 3 weeks. Remote platforms that didn’t seem relevant just a few short weeks ago have become the center of recent conversations among colleagues and in social media.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="2/3"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]How are we spending our time? Some staff interpreters are still being required to go to court for emergency hearings while others are teleworking, using remote platforms, or rotating their duties by taking turns going to courtrooms to interpret for detained defendants. For as much as the shelter-in-place orders and disaster declarations have affected courtrooms and courthouses throughout the nation, many things continue unchanged; attorneys still need to meet with clients, and other litigation continues its course. Freelancers are suddenly faced with requests from courts, agencies, and clients alike to provide their services remotely. What may have seemed like a pipedream of a court administrator wanting to save money has now hit us in the face as a new reality. Some of us may feel that our choices are to adapt to remote platforms or wait out the virus hoping to stretch our bank account until business as usual opens up to a reasonable degree. What once seemed like a platform that only benefited the courts as a cost saving method is now seen by some as a lifeline to work in a safe and healthy environment as we face a global pandemic.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="1/3"][blockquote text="What once seemed like a platform that only benefited the courts as a cost saving method is now seen by some as a lifeline to work in a safe and healthy environment as we face a global pandemic." show_quote_icon="yes" text_color="#1b3b62" quote_icon_color="#1b3b62"][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]
[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index="" padding_top="50"][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="28459" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text]

By Sandro Tomasi

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="2/3"][vc_column_text] Interpreters have long been underappreciated and undervalued in the United States, a situation due mainly to the lack of proper identification of the level of knowledge, skill and ability needed to perform as a competent interpreter. Many people, especially monolinguals, still believe that all interpreting consists of is repeating something word-for-word in another language, which is contrary to accepted practice in the field of interpreting. In addition, there exists a callous sentiment that some people have towards immigrants in this country. Whereas women and African Americans have movements to help their cause (MeToo, Black Lives Matter), immigrants do not have such a clear path for equality. Nonetheless, recent advancements have been made in California and New York, as can be seen by comparing the court compensation policies between interpreters and other job titles. This data shines a light on how state courts have been undervaluing and underpaying for the job of court interpreting. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]Compensation Policies: Federal v. State[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text] In 2017, the California Federation of Interpreters (CFI) made a crucial compensation comparison of similar job titles between state and federal courts. The comparison revealed that many job titles in the California state courts had salary parity with their counterparts in the federal courts, but that the court interpreter job title had a salary that was about half that of its federal counterpart.

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_empty_space height="50px"][vc_row_inner row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" css_animation=""][vc_column_inner width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="28458" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width="3/4"][vc_column_text] By Malena Ramírez-Colón [/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_single_image image="28501" img_size="full" alignment="center" qode_css_animation=""][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text][Malena Ramírez-Colón is an actor and illustrator from Puerto Rico. She is a faculty member at the School of...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]Editor-in-Chief of Proteus[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="28465" style="vc_box_rounded" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text]Salua Kamerow is a Colombian lawyer, Master of Laws from Penn State University, and Master of Science in Translation from New York...

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index="" padding_top="50"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Letter from the Editor: Proteus 2020 Summer Volume XXXIII Issue No 1[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="28465" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text]By Salua Kamerow[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_separator type="transparent"][vc_column_text]Let me...