Main Conference Schedule: Saturday & Sunday

Our sessions provide you with a multitude of educational options to learn new skills, expand your knowledge, and participate in discussions on current issues within the interpreting and translation professions. You will find a vast array of session options covering all levels of expertise.

All presenter biographies can be found here.

Saturday, June 6th, 2020

8:00 AM – 10:00 AM

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change.

DOES YOUR ENGLISH MATCH YOUR SUIT? REFLECT A MORE PROFESSIONAL IMAGE

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: PROF. KAREN BORGENHEIMER

English is the language of the courts in the United States, and as such, it is IMPERATIVE that interpreters communicate with concise and unaccented English. Do you feel less professional when speaking English? Does your accent interfere with an otherwise perfect rendition? Do you have trouble being concise in English? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then this 2-hour language neutral workshop is for you! In this fast-paced, high energy workshop, the instructor will guide you through spoken and written exercises in English to help you “Say What You Mean” with PRECISION. You will feel more professional and confident the next time you put on your business suit for your interpreting gig.

Objectives: In this 2-hour, language-neutral workshop, participants will learn how to speak more concisely, minimize common errors and eliminate unnecessary words and confusing verbal clutter in English through targeted written exercises. Attendees will then apply tried and true tricks to overcome that troublesome pronunciation in English with a series of oral exercises designed to polish articulation, enunciation and voice projection.

TEAM INTERPRETING: THE GOOD INTERPRETER AND THE INTERPRETER FROM HELL [ETHICS]

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: TONY ROSADO

Lengthy interpreting assignments are complex and difficult, they require a level of concentration. knowledge, and alertness only achievable when working as a team. Team interpreting is a cooperative effort where team members perform tasks before and during the rendition. This session will explain the benefits of team interpreting in a manner that participants can later use to explain to their clients why an interpretation service cannot be properly provided by a single individual. The presenter will describe in detail the role of each team member, from the tasks they must perform before the assignment, to the rendition itself. Mr. Rosado will outline  the criteria used to select team members, team expectations, active and passive roles during the interpretation, booth etiquette, and best practices for court and escort interpreters, based on both theoretical description and practical examples. By the end of the session, the participants will leave with the necessary tools to be a good team member and avoid becoming a teammate from hell.

Objectives:Interpreters attending the session will enhance their understanding of team interpreting: Its benefits, types, requirements. The presenter will discuss the criteria and best practices to select team members and the distribution of tasks among them. Participants will learn what is expected from a team member: booth etiquette, mutual support during court hearings and escort assignments, professional courtesy, correct role of active and passive interpreters, and how to avoid practices and attitudes that harm the rendition and team spirit.

ZEN AND THE ART OF INTERPRETING

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: ATHENA MATILSKY

This session is for anyone who has ever felt their blood pressure rise as they try to recall a term while the whole room stares at them and waits. It is for anyone who gets nervous when engaged in long consecutive interpreting, or who has studied for months for a certification only to get thrown off the day of the exam. Interpreting technique is vitally important, but having the skills is only half the battle; if we lack confidence, we set ourselves up for trouble. In this workshop participants will learn a path to success by identifying goals, stating clear objectives, engaging in honest self-reflection to understand what may be holding them back, and overcome obstacles to what they want to accomplish. Ancillary techniques, such as yoga breathing and active self-compassion, will also be taught to complement introspective goal-setting skills. Participants will leave the workshop with a better understanding of how to rise to the challenges they face.

ASYLUM AND INTERNATIONAL REFUGEE PROTECTION IN THE U.S. LEGAL AND POLITICAL CONTEXT

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: TAMBER HILTON

This session is for anyone who has heard the words “refugee” and “asylee” or “asylum” and wondered what the difference was, or if a difference even exists. In this session, Tamber Hilton, a court interpreter and an experienced practitioner in the field of refugee protection, will discuss essential principles of international refugee law and how these relate to the unique dual-track refugee protection system in the U.S. Be prepared for an exciting introduction to the U.S. overseas refugee resettlement program, with its processing centers operating across Europe, Africa, and Asia, and reception agencies across the domestic United States. Participants will understand how the overseas resettlement program compares to domestic asylum as it is currently implemented at the border and in the U.S. interior. In addition to an overview of the difference between refugee resettlement and the domestic adjudication of asylum applications, the presentation will also include illustrative current events and trends in refugee protection law and policy from the last few years, such as presidential reductions to refugee resettlement caps, the recently implemented Migrant Protection Protocols and the safe third country agreement with Guatemala, as well as other current legal and policy issues that will help participants build an informed, up-to-date understanding of a topic of current national interest.

ObjectivesAttendees will be introduced broadly to international refugee law and protection issues from a U.S. legal and current events perspective. By the end of the session, attendees will have a general understanding of what the sources of international and domestic refugee law are and what the definition of a refugee is under U.S. and international law. Participants will also learn the difference between the U.S. overseas refugee resettlement program, which is operated out of international centers around the world in cooperation with international non-governmental agencies, and the domestic adjudication of asylum claims from the U.S. interior.

TO INTERPRET, NOT EXPLAIN: A HAITIAN-CREOLE COURT INTERPRETER’S GUIDANCE FOR THE PROFESSIONAL AND ETHICAL INTERPRETING OF LEGAL TERMINOLOGY. [ETHICS]

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: HAITIAN-CREOLE
PRESENTER: REGINE DUROSKY-MURRAY

Haitian-Creole interpreters do not have a wide range of reference materials at their disposal to research legal terminologies to prepare for trials and other court proceedings. As a result, some of them find themselves explaining instead of interpreting, thereby finding themselves violating ethical and other professional rules that interpreters must follow.  This interactive presentation focuses on steps that interpreters can take to no longer explain but interpret faithfully and accurately, and avoid violating the code of ethics for interpreters.

Objectives: After completing this workshop, participants will be able to prepare better for trials and identify strategies for avoiding ethical issues.

Saturday, June 6th, 2020

10:30 AM – Noon

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change

TRANSLATION OF CRIMINAL LEGAL TERMINOLOGY INTO RUSSIAN/UKRAINIAN

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: RUSSIAN AND ENGLISH
PRESENTER: NATALIIA WORRELL, PhD.

 

The session will be presented in RUSSIAN. The goal of the proposed workshop is to discuss and compile a working glossary of the most commonly used criminal law terminology in the State of Florida and discuss its translation into Russian and Ukrainian, based on the following classification: 1) Terms and technical phrases that have full equivalents in Russian/Ukrainian legal systems; 2) Terms and technical phrases that have partial equivalents in Russian/Ukrainian legal systems; 3) Terms and technical phrases that do not have equivalents in Russian/Ukrainian legal system. Proposed translation options will be discussed. Russian and Ukrainian interpreters from the other states are encouraged to participate.

Objectives: To discuss and compile a working glossary of criminal law terms and their translations into Russian (based on the terminology used in the State of Florida).

TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETATION EXCELLENCE: A CASE FOR TRANSLATION

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: DANIEL TAMAYO

Starting with a discussion about the differences between translation and interpretation, in this interactive session Mr. Tamayo will explore the relationship between the two practices and how a solid command of translation knowledge and skills improves interpreters’ renditions and competitiveness. The presenter will also address practice and training issues aimed at improving competence in translation and interpretation as mutually enriching professions.

SPORTS, LANGUAGE AND CULTURE: UNDERSTANDING AMERICAN ENGLISH SPORTS ANALOGIES AND METAPHORS

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: JAVIER CASTILLO

Do you sometimes feel that you’re stuck behind the 8-ball?  Do the people you interpret for sometimes come at you with terms from way out in left field? Does it make you just want to throw in the towel? As we know, language and culture are intertwined.  To truly understand a language, you have to understand the culture of those who speak it. There is also no doubt that sports are a huge part of American life and thus it is no surprise that American English is filled with phrases related to sporting events. In this interactive session, participants will work in teams to decipher some of the more common (and a few of the more esoteric) sports analogies and metaphors used in business, law, medicine and almost every other walk of life. THIS IS A LANGUAGE NEUTRAL WORKSHOP FOR ALL INTERPRETERS – MEDICAL, LEGAL, CONFERENCE AND COMMUNITY

IS AN EMOJI WORTH 1,000 WORDS?

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTERS: OLGA SHOSTACHUK

Substituting or complementing the written word with symbols seems to be a trend today, even for the most awkward social dystopians. Language always changes, but it’s exceedingly rare—maybe even unprecedented—for a phonetic alphabet to suddenly acquire a big expansion pack of ideograms. Peppering our digital communication with convenient non-verbal cues and well-timed wit in the form of Emoji is exactly how people interact when they chat every day, making faces and gesturing, but what do emojis mean for a translator, or even better, a legal translator? Indeed, the legal world has had to take notice of Emoji, as lawyers have started bringing forward text communications sent by people accused of crime as evidence and adding them to the courtroom repertoire: texts, sexts, emails, tweets, laced with emojis. Through interactive exercises, glossary building, and a discussion on best practices, attendees will acquire various techniques and strategies for interpreting Emoji in different settings and preparing translations with emotional context and non-verbal communication. The session is presented in English and Emoji.

Objectives: In this interactive session, attendees will identify cross-cultural pitfalls and technological divides in vastly different interpretations of emojis and will learn how to find the best way to accurately convey the meaning of emojis. The participants will also learn the latest trends in research and legal discourse pertaining to Emoji and improve their Emoji terminology management and research skills. The session is presented in English and Emoji.

ADVANCED SIMULTANEOUS WORKSHOP

LEVEL: ADVANCED
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: AGUSTÍN SERVIN DE LA MORA

Join Agustín de la Mora, president of DE LA MORA Institute of Interpretation, for a highly interactive skill-building for the simultaneous mode! Designed for intermediate to advanced skill levels, this presentation takes a highly practical approach to improvement through detailed self-evaluation exercises. Be sure to BRING A RECORDING DEVICE AND HEADSET! You won’t want to miss this chance to apply the interpreting theories that continue to make DE LA MORA a nationally recognized name in interpreter education.

Participants should come equipped with their own recording devices and a headset.

Saturday, June 6th, 2020

2:45 PM – 3:45 PM

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change

PROGRESS ON IMPLEMENTATION OF CALIFORNIA’S LANGUAGE ACCESS PLAN FOR THE COURTS

LEVEL: ALL LEVLES
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: DOUGLAS DENTON AND HON. VICTOR A. RODRIGUEZ

The Chair of the Judicial Council of California’s Language Access Subcommittee of the Advisory Committee on Providing Access and Fairness and Language Access Services Program, Hon. Victor A. Rodriguez, will provide an update on ongoing efforts to implement the Strategic Plan for Language Access in the California Courts (adopted January 2015). The presentation will cover plan implementation efforts and progress to date, including securing funding for interpreters to provide services in all criminal and civil cases, and an update on video remote and technological solutions for both inside and outside the courtroom. The session will highlight various language access accomplishments made by the Language Access Subcommittee and products added to the online resource, the Language Access Toolkit, including multilingual public outreach materials developed by California with the National Center for State Courts. The session will also provide an opportunity for participants to ask questions and make comments about ongoing plan implementation and monitoring.

Objectives: Participants will learn about language access plan implementation, including progress to date in the California courts, how plan implementation affects them professionally as interpreters or translators, and provide an opportunity to receive comments from those in attendance that could help improve the ongoing implementation of the plan.

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES COURTS (AOUSC) UPDATE

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
PRESENTER: JAVIER SOLER

Join a representative from the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts to discuss recent updates and engage in a question and answer session.

PORTUGUESE COURT INTERPRETING 101 [ETHICS, PORTUGUESE]

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: PORTUGUESE
PRESENTER: CLARISSA SUREK-CLARK

Despite the large number of Lusophone speakers in the United States, Portuguese remains a language of limited diffusion. Interpreters aiming to work in this language combination often lack training, and specialized materials are difficult to find. This presentation aims to guide aspiring and practicing Portuguese interpreters in basic issues surrounding Court interpreting: differences in legal systems in Brazil and the United States, divergent cultural understanding of court appearances, legal terminology, challenges experienced in real cases. The presentation will be in Portuguese and examples will be provided in Portuguese and English.

Objectives: Attendees will become familiarized with terminology and practical matters while interpreting for Portuguese speakers in the United States. Topics to be covered include differences in legal systems, cultural understanding of court appearances, and other challenges future interpreters may face in their professional lives.

CONSECUTIVE PLAYBACK INTERPRETING: THE STATE OF THE ART

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: ERIK CAMAYD-FREIXAS

It has been 20+ years since the first attempts at consecutive interpreting aided by a digital voice recorder. The method has received different names along the way, including simul-consecutive interpreting, DRAC interpreting, and others. During this time several articles have been published about it worldwide, an untold number of interpreters are using it, and recording technologies have advanced quite a bit. There are now numerous devices that support this method. Aided by a PowerPoint presentation, this session will include a description and demo of the method; a review of the literature, including results of experimental trials; an overview of its development and evolving technology; and the results of a pilot study to be carried out this spring 2020 at the 13th Judicial Circuit of Florida.

TERMINOLOGY AND PROCEDURES FOR FEDERAL COURT INTERPRETERS

LEVEL: ADVANCED
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: CYNTHIA LEPELEY

Many federal court proceedings have parallels in state and municipal courts, but there are aspects that are unique, and the more completely interpreters prepare for federal proceedings in advance, the more accurately and easily they will be able to interpret. This session will familiarize participants with terminology and procedures that are specific to federal court hearings and cases. (What is an AUSA? What is a CJA panel attorney? What are the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, and how do they work? What are the 18 USC § 3553 factors that federal judges always refer to during sentencing hearings? What is the safety valve? Where can an interpreter find case information before a federal hearing?) Attendees will receive lists of terms that are commonly used in each type of federal hearing, and will also review and sight translate sample documents that are frequently encountered in federal court.

Objectives: The purpose of this session is to introduce court interpreters to the terminology and procedures that are unique to the context of federal courts.

Saturday, June 6th, 2020

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change

AN OVERVIEW OF CAT TOOLS - WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS FOR LEGAL TRANSLATORS AND INTERPRETERS?

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: RICARDO BARDO-PORTILLA, PhD.

Translators are finding it more and more difficult nowadays to find jobs if they do not know how to use Computer Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. A growing number of agencies and institutions are requiring that translators master some sort of Translation Memory Software.  The purpose of this presentation is to offer an overview of some of the CAT tools available in the market today. What are the features that can improve translators’ terminology management, productivity, and accuracy without sacrificing quality? How can interpreters compile glossaries from previous translations? The following topics will be discussed: terminology databases, text alignment, Neural Machine Translation (NMT), Optical Character Recognition (OCR) tools for the translation of PDF documents, and “Trados Quotes”.

MANAGING COGNITIVE BIAS WHEN INTERPRETING OR TRANSLATING FOR EVIDENTIARY PURPOSES [ETHICS]

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: DAVID GILBERT, PhD.

The presenter will discuss the theory of cognitive bias and how it relates to translation theory. By comparing the psychology of intelligence analysis and the interpreting/translation process attendants will be provided with strategic parameters to make optimal interpreting and translation choices based on context and background information. Strategies to mitigate adverse cognitive bias will be discussed and demonstrated through examples of translation and interpreting error showing how cognitive bias has influenced evidence presented in court.

Objectives: Attendees will be able to identify areas of cognitive bias that have the potential to unfairly influence information transfer from one language to another that may affect the reliability of testimonial evidence. Attendees will be able to apply strategies to mitigate instances of cognitive bias, participating in an exercise designed to identify and apply skills to manage cognitive bias to achieve optimal outcomes.

SKILL BUILDING WITH COGNITIVE TASK ANALYSIS AS YOUR GPS

LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: YONGMEI LI

This is a language neutral presentation with online mandarin audio provided as reference. Effective skill development is the focus of this 60-min presentation, targeting interpreters who want to take their skills to the next level but are not sure how to go about it in a systematic way.    Cognitive task analysis (CTA), a way of breaking down complex tasks, will first be introduced as a tool to separate interpreting into tasks and associated skills, which together make up a map that guides the training process.  CTA will be explained using consecutive interpreting as a model.   Once skills are identified, the presenter will use shadowing exercise as to illustrate how setting an objective and conducting evaluations are key to making an exercise effective in skill development.

Participants should come prepared with their own device (smartphone, laptop, tablet) with internet connectivity. Free Wi-Fi access available on site.

Objectives: Attendees will learn cognitive task analysis as a tool to identify the tasks and associated skills interpretation entails and how this approach can guide them in further skill development.

CAREER DEVELOPMENT FOR LOTS COURT INTERPRETERS [ETHICS]

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTERS: LILI SELDEN

Languages Other Than Spanish (LOTS) judiciary interpreters, especially those who speak a Language of Lesser Diffusion (LLD), often feel isolated due to the lack of language-specific workshops, study materials, colleagues, role models, and exam-taking opportunities, not to mention interpreting and co-interpreting assignments. This session acknowledges the obstacles to professional mastery and fiscal stability faced by LLD judiciary interpreters, then discusses the resources available to counteract those obstacles and the ways in which LOTS and LLD interpreters, together with support from NAJIT and local ATA chapters, can help empower each other with information, seek out mentors and role models, and pursue complementary revenue streams.

Objectives: This is a language-neutral presentation. The main learning objective of the presentation is to affirm the obstacles faced by LOTS interpreters as they master judiciary interpreting skills, and to discuss the ways in which the wisdom and experience amassed by seasoned interpreters in any language may help minimize the impact of those obstacles. A secondary objective is to recognize that the professionalization of the field of judiciary interpreting must take into account the need for proper training of LOTS interpreters to ensure uniformity of standards, both linguistically and in terms of adherence to the Code of Ethics.

SO MANY OPTIONS, SO LITTLE TIME... PICKING THE BEST TERM BY ASSESSING SOURCES.

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: HEIDI CAZES

Translators and interpreters rely on different tools when doing research to solve terminology problems. Nowadays, translators and interpreters have access to innumerable types of documents and sources, which sometimes provide many options to choose from. While in the past finding enough information could be a problem, today it might seem that there is too much of a good thing. When deciding which is the term one should use in a translation or when preparing for an interpretation, it is necessary to go beyond a list of options, and consider -among other things- where the proposed term came from. And no matter the type of source being used, the term one will finally decide to use will only be as good as the quality of the sources one is relying on. This presentation will address the different types of source materials that can be useful in terminology research. It will also provide different criteria for assessing those sources and their results, to help in deciding if they are correct or which would be the best option for the specific translation it will be used in.

Objectives: The objective of this presentation is to allow attendees to assess the sources they find when searching for the correct term in the target language. Attendees will understand what is a term, and the difference between terms and words in general language. They will learn about the different types of sources they can use in their research. Finally, they will learn how to assess the quality of those sources, because the final decision on which term to use in the target language will only be as good as the source being used.

Sunday, June 7th, 2020

8:00 AM – 8:45 AM

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change

TOWN HALL

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
PANELISTS: THE NAJIT BOARD OF DIRECTORS
MODERATOR: ARMANDO EZQUERRA HASBUN, NAJIT CHAIR

Join the NAJIT Board and key committee chairs to discuss NAJIT and issues within the profession.

Sunday, June 7th, 2020

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change

EMERGING CRIMES IN THE US

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH WITH SPANISH LEXICON
PRESENTER: ÉDGAR HIDALGO GARCÍA

To say that computers, communication systems, and other new technologies are changing the way crime is being committed is a vast understatement. Social Media, Cryptocurrency, the Dark Web, and other innovations have provided new and creative ways for the commission of old crimes, while giving rise to new crimes that have only recently gained the public’s attention. This one-hour presentation will examine statistics on crime in America, emergent crimes that are trending, and suggested equivalents for this new terminology.

Objectives: This presentation will briefly review statistics of the most common crimes in the United States, examine crimes that are emerging as a byproduct of new technologies, and help interpreters identify key terminology and their best Spanish equivalents.

DOWN TO THE WIRE: SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETING AND TERMINOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR WIRE FRAUD CASES

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: DIANA ARBISER AND FATIMA CORNWALL

This language-neutral session will focus on electronic/wire fraud vocabulary in the context of simultaneous interpreting. Participants will have the opportunity to develop their simultaneous interpreting skills using a pre-recorded script, and to research terms in their target languages. At the conclusion of the session, participants will be able to reflect on their performances and identify areas that may need further development.

Participants should come equipped with their own personal devices (smartphone, laptop, tablet) with internet connectivity, plus headphones/earbuds, to play and listen to the audio. Free Wi-Fi access is available on site.

Objectives: Interpreters that attend this session will be able to develop their simultaneous interpreting skills through the performance of exercises related to wire fraud cases. They will learn to select reputable resources and tools for further research and to Increase their target language terminology. Finally, attendees will be able to reflect on their performances to identify areas where they may need additional practice.

SHOW ME THE MONEY!!

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH WITH SPANISH LEXICON
PRESENTER: ANDY BENZO

This session aims to help attendees gain an understanding of what the disposition of a person’s estate in Common Law and Civil Law entails. What happens to one’s estate at death? Who has a right to it? How is the estate distributed? The different ways of settling an estate whether it be by will, trust, or the law of succession will be examined. Who gets what? What about Fluffy the cat? What about Aunt Cruella? Can we leave her out? Join the presenter in this fascinating exploratory journey of probate law and find out who gets the money!!!!

Objectives: This presentation will review the concepts and related terminology of probate law in English and Spanish.

IT’S TIME TO AUTOMATE IT! [ARABIC]

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: ARABIC AND ENGLISH
PRESENTER: ABDELAAZIZ EL GHAYATE

Language professionals spend a lot of time looking for information on the internet, often repeating clicks and processes while they are working. Automating tasks is possible through some open-source scripting languages such as AutoHotkey which, along with other useful tools, remains unused or underused by many language professionals. This presentation will focus on a small automation tool that was originally created for personal use and later shared with colleagues in the Arabic translation section at the United Nations. This tool integrates resources geared to meet the needs of Arabic translators, but the concept of this tool is adaptable and relevant to other language professionals as well. The presentation will highlight other useful applications of automation and the areas where they can be utilized, including how to make bookmarks/favorites work for you in your translation/revision/editing work. Automation can speed up your search processes and streamline repetitive tasks, launching programs, and auto-correcting spelling mistakes or expanding abbreviations through the use of scripting. The presentation will be presented in Arabic and English.

Objectives: The presentation will highlight the usefulness of automation for language professionals and identify the areas where automation can be applied, including how to create really useful bookmarks for work, speeding up search processes and automating repetitive tasks, auto-correcting spelling mistakes, and expanding abbreviations by using scripting.

CAN YOU KEEP A SECRET? ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE AND INTERPRETERS [ETHICS]

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTERS: ERNEST NIÑO-MURCIA

Interpreters may aspire to be invisible conduits of communication, but as facilitators of communication between attorneys and clients, they can sometimes find themselves in the crosshairs when an attorney or client tries to draw them into a dispute where the information they have interpreted can become relevant evidence. Participants will be asked to reflect on their own experiences and examine different codes of ethics to determine how the principles of interpreter confidentiality intersect with attorney-client privilege.

Objectives: Participants will be able to analyze different codes of ethics to identify key principles of interpreter confidentiality with respect to attorney-client privilege.

Sunday, June 7th, 2020

10:30 AM – Noon

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change

WHAT IS YOUR HIGHEST LEVEL OF EDUCATION? [ETHICS, SPANISH]

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: SPANISH
PRESENTERS: MARIA CAMILLA PULIDO AND MAGDALIZ AROURA

As court interpreters we encounter this question frequently. It is part and parcel of a set of background questions asked to establish an important foundation in cases where the defense is alleging duress, entrapment, ignorance of the law, diminished capacity, provocation, and insanity, among other things.  However, interpreting the answer to this question is not always as simple as one might think, and often requires some localization work on the part of the interpreter. Variations exist in the public and private education systems of Latin-American countries and the United States, and being familiar with these differences can be a very useful tool for accurately interpreting the responses to this question, even after verifying the answer with the LEP. Participants are encouraged to share their own cultural and personal background knowledge during the discussion of this topic.

Objectives: Attendees will learn about the differences between the public and private education systems of Latin-American countries and the United States. They will become aware of the complexities involved in answering what appears to be a simple question, and the need to perform localization to render an accurate interpretation of responses involving levels of education.

BUSINESS SAVVY FOR THE INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: FRAN SAMUEL

Translators and interpreters spend most of their professional development learning about vocabulary, interpreting techniques, ethics, etc., but rarely have the opportunity to learn the business aspect of the profession. As independent contractors, we have a responsibility to ourselves to be able to navigate the complexities of independent contract negotiations, working with large language providers, insuring proper accounting practices, identifying scams, and successfully marketing our businesses in the era of globalization. In this session, attendees will be provided with tax tips and information that can help independent contractors run their businesses   confidently and effectively.

TEAM INTERPRETING [ETHICS]

LEVEL: ALL LEVELS
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: GLADYS SEGAL

This interactive session will be presented as an open session inviting questions from the audience. Attendees will learn about the origins and development of team interpreting dating back all the way to Nuremberg and progressing to the present. The direct link between Teaming and the fulfillment of the Interpreter’s Oath will be examined, as will the pitfalls of interpreting solo for lengthy and/or complex proceedings.  Setting adverse precedents when interpreting can lead to an appeal, and actions taken by the interpreter will be explored within the context of the Court Interpreter’s Code of Ethics.

Objectives:  Those attending this session will be exposed to the importance of Teaming across all sectors of interpreting and, specifically, in Court Interpreting. Attendees will examine how practicing Teaming is essential to the interpreter’s being able to meet the legal and ethical responsibility interpreters accept when they take the Interpreter’s Oath.  The session is intended to provide court interpreters with a deeper and more encompassing understanding of the relationship between Teaming and the Interpreter’s Oath.

This presentation is planned to coincide with the publication of NAJIT’s revised position paper on the subject.

CRIMINAL-JUSTICE TERMINOLOGY [CHINESE]

LEVEL: BEGINNER / INTERMEDIATE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH WITH CHINESE LEXICON
PRESENTER: SANDRO TOMASI

Legal translation/interpreting is a double operation consisting of both legal and interlingual transfer, with an emphasis on the transfer of legal concepts, which constitutes the principal operation. With this presentation, attendees will learn about the principles and techniques of legal translation, conduct an analysis of Chinese-English law dictionaries, and translate Chinese criminal-procedure statutes into English.

Objectives: Interpreters and translators will learn how to go beyond the prima-facie meaning of a legal term by using statutes and treatises to identify fully the legal semantics involved.

INTERPRETING FOR PLEA BARGAINS IN STATE COURTS

LEVEL: BASIC AND INTERMEDIATE
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: SANDRA DEJEUX

Current research shows that between ninety-five and ninety-seven percent of criminal cases are resolved by a guilty or nolo contendere plea. A significant number of criminal defendants are individuals with Limited English Proficiency (LEP). Without an interpreter, there can be no due process for these defendants. The length of the documents that require sight translations, the technical terminology, and the time constraints imposed by heavy court dockets make it difficult for interpreters to excel when sight translating the plea packages, particularly when an interpreter does not possess the necessary knowledge and skills to perform sight translation. This presentation will share the results of a small case study conducted by the presenter in several district courts in Texas, plus walk attendees through the process of translating and interpreting plea agreements in state courts, highlighting the differences and similarities, and offering alternatives to help attendees excel when performing these tasks.