Main Conference Sessions

40th Annual Conference

Main Conference Schedule: Saturday & Sunday

Our sessions provide you with a multitude of educational options to learn new skills, expand your knowledge, and participate in discussions on current issues within the interpreting and translation professions. You will find a vast array of session options covering all levels of expertise.

All presenter biographies can be found here.

Saturday, May 18th, 2019

8:00 AM – 10:00 AM

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change.

“CINEMATIC MEMORY”

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: AGUSTÍN SERVIN DE LA MORA

Interpreters are expected to cope with a large amount of information and must decide in a short period of time how best to retain and retransmit the messages they receive into the target language. Students will discuss the relationship between memory and note-taking and will practice constructing a narrative for ease of recall and improved confidence.

Objectives: During this interactive session, participants will learn how to improve consecutive interpreting skills by utilizing mnemonic techniques to improve confidence in their stored memories and how to apply said techniques to their daily work as court interpreters.

OMG, WTF? TEXTSPEAK IN THE COURTROOM [ETHICS]

LEVEL: ADVANCED
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH W/ SPANISH EXAMPLESL
PRESENTER: ELLEN WINGO

Screenshots of texts, tweets, and Facebook posts: new media are everywhere in modern life, so naturally they are finding their way into the courtroom. Lawyers and litigants see them as hard evidence to prove their cases; court interpreters see them as something out of a nightmare. The abbreviations and emojis that are typical of new media can make textspeak appear as foreign as Egyptian hieroglyphs, making an accurate sight translation a seemingly impossible task. But the code can be cracked. Through practical exercises, glossary building, and an open discussion on ethics and best practices, this session will address various approaches to deciphering textspeak and to deciding how and when to sight translate in court. This session will be conducted in English with Spanish and English examples.

Objectives: Participants will learn techniques to decipher textspeak and improve their familiarity with the terminology common to new media. They will be able to identify the factors that could make a sight translation possible or impossible, and how to approach the task in an ethical manner.

RETHINKING RESEARCH: CAN IT ACTUALLY MAKE ME A BETTER INTERPRETER?

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: PROF. AÍDA MARTÍNEZ-GÓMEZ, PHD AND MELISSA WALLACE, PHD

Interpretation is a profession in which one never stops learning. Interpreters are often faced with aspects of the profession they would like to learn more about. But how to go about it? Where to even start looking? This interactive session will provide attendees with key resources and strategies to find answers to their questions by academic research. During the first part of the session, the presenters will share examples of research that have practical implications for and applications to daily interpreting practice. Attendees will learn about what studies can be useful, how to find them, how to assess their quality and applicability, and how to transfer the findings of those studies to their jobs. The second part of the session will be hands-on: attendees will put this information into practice to go through the process of trying to answer one or more questions by consulting academic research. Participants should bring your gadgets (laptops, tablets, phones)! Participants will work in small groups with the support and guidance of an SSTI Board member. Finally, the third part of the session will be a Q&A roundtable-style discussion where the SSTI Board and the audience will engage in a productive dialogue about the group practice experiences and, more broadly, about interpreters’ needs and expectations for professional development and how academic research can be an effective tool for achieving that goal.

Objectives: Interpreters will be able to research and evaluate academic studies for purposes of professional development, and to be able to apply any useful findings to their jobs.

FROM STATE TO FEDERAL; A COURSE FOR LOTS INTERPRETERS IN INTERPRETING IN FEDERAL COURT [ETHICS]

LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE / ADVANCED
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: ANGELA CHENUS

As cases concerning languages other than Spanish (LOTS) grow significantly in the federal courts, interpreters who may be certified with the NSCS or NAJIT, but not federally, are being called upon in greater numbers by federal public defenders, prosecutors, courts and federal investigators to work in the federal system. When an interpreter accepts an assignment to interpret in Federal Court for the first time, it may feel like just another court assignment. The nuances and their implications, both for interpreting and for time management are greater than one might expect.

Workshop proposal: Part one, a brief overview of the types of federal court and cases tried by the United States Federal Judiciary. Exploring structure (why is there a podium and where do I stand?), proceedings, principles and expectations of the interpreter in federal court. Learn what can happen when an interpreter is out on an investigation with a federal agent, or helping with other proceedings, and prepare for the new opportunities opening up for interpreters in the federal system. Part two, practicing interpretation and glossary-building. The interpreter will not be caught by surprise when she or he needs to interpret; “Federal Sentencing Guidelines” during a phone interview for the first time. A resource guide full of online and other sources of information will be provided.

Objectives: Interpreters who work in a state court setting will feel prepared for the differences encountered when heading into proceedings in the Federal Court System; will have the answers to the questions asked of them; and may confidently work from the first encounter to the invoicing.

HUELLAS DACTILARES EN SU TINTA

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: SPANISH
PRESENTER: DR. GLORIA RIVERA, CMI, CHI

Fingerprints are a type of physical evidence that can be left on a murder weapon, found at a crime scene, and used to identify human remains. Its analysis uses biological samples for profiling suspects, identifying criminals, and disproving claims. This subject may come up during an expert witness testimony and court. Interpreters need to understand this subject in order to convey the correct meaning. Class presented in Spanish with terminology in English.

Objectives: Participants will be able to describe what a fingerprint is made of, identify the different types of fingerprints, and explain how they are used to “catch the bad guys and set the innocent free”.

Saturday, May 18th, 2019

10:30 AM – Noon

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change

EXPLORING SIGHTMULTANEOUS INTERPRETING: A HYBRID MODE

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: ERNEST NIÑO-MURCIA

 

Hearing a witness be asked, “Could you please read that paragraph from your report?” can strike fear into the heart of even skilled, experienced court interpreters. They may or may not know what is coming next, but whatever it is will be coming at them FAST because people have a natural tendency to read faster than they speak. Having a copy of whatever materials will be read into the record can offer some measure of relief, but the challenge is nonetheless formidable. Whether it is considered very fast sight translation with a “voiceover” or simultaneous interpreting with the benefit of a “cheat sheet,” the hybrid mode interpreters must employ in these situations can be challenging and disorienting at first. This session aims to first offer a theoretical overview of “sightmultaneous” interpreting, while providing tips on preparation and technique before giving participants a chance to try it for themselves working from English into their target language.

Objectives: Attendees will first be able to analyze sightmultaneous as a mode of interpreting and complete practice exercises in this mode to refine their skills and identify effective strategies.

SO MANY OPTIONS, SO LITTLE TIME... PICKING THE BEST TERM BY ASSESSING YOUR SOURCES.

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: HEIDI CAZES

Translators and interpreters rely on different tools when doing research to solve terminology problems. Nowadays, translators and interpreters have access to innumerable types of documents and sources, which sometimes provide many options to choose from. While in the past finding enough information could be a problem, today it might seem that there is too much of a good thing. When deciding which term one should use in a translation or when preparing for an interpretation, it is necessary to go beyond a list of options, and to consider, among other things, where the proposed term came from. And no matter the type of source being used, the term one will finally decide to use will only be as good as the quality of the sources one is relying on. This presentation will address the different types of source materials that can be useful in terminology research. It will also provide different criteria for assessing those sources and their results, to help in deciding if they are correct or which would be the best option for the specific translation it will be used in.

Objectives: The objective of this presentation is to allow attendees to assess the sources they find when searching for the correct term in the target language;  to understand what a term is and the difference between terms and words in general language; and to know different types of sources or documents they can use in their research. Finally, they will learn how to assess the quality of those sources.

SOLVING THE MYSTERY: LEGAL TERMINOLOGY FOR BILATERAL PROCEEDINGS MEXICO-U.S.

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: SPANISH
PRESENTER: TONY ROSADO

This presentation, in Spanish, is for full time court interpreters and legal translators who, occasionally, run into terminology not always easy to understand or translate. Lack of understanding of the true meaning of a legal term can conceal the true context and meaning of actions, hearings, and legal strategies, making it difficult to interpret immigration, trade, and international law. Those attending the presentation will learn the answer to questions such as: the difference between asylee and refugee; deportation, immigration judge and officer; credible fear, good moral character, relief, employment-based and family-based immigration; MOUs, treatises and international conventions; tax and tariff; extradition and many more. Today these are fundamental concepts for all interpreters, regardless of their field of expertise. The session will cover these concepts in U.S. legal English and Mexican legal Spanish. They will be analyzed, explained and contextualized. The instructor will suggest bibliography for each term and will provide a glossary. Those attending the presentation will understand attorneys and judges better, producing a more accurate rendition.

WHY INTERPRET IN IMMIGRATION COURT, AND WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO DO IT? TIPS AND PERSPECTIVES FROM EOIR INTERPRETERS

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTERS: TAMBER HILTON AND PATRICIA STEPHENSON

EOIR interpreting is often considered second-tier work within the court interpreting profession. Yet, it can involve some of the most skill-intensive, varied, and fascinating work a court interpreter might do. In this session, two veteran court-certified EOIR interpreters working primarily in the Arlington immigration court will share their experiences and those of colleagues nationwide to provide a balanced picture of what interpreting in immigration court is like, and what it takes to do it. Attendees will learn practical information about EOIR as an administrative court, including its place in the larger federal judiciary and in the immigration enforcement system, and about the types of cases they are likely to encounter in immigration court. Presenters will also discuss practical sources of terminology and background knowledge for working in EOIR. Attendees can look forward to an exciting session offered by passionate immigration court interpreters with a strong grasp of immigration law and an interest in promoting high standards of interpretation in EOIR.

Objectives: Attendees will learn about the immigration court interpreting experience, and how it differs from regular district courts; about the immigration court itself and where it sits in the judicial system; what types of cases they are likely to encounter in immigration court; and the role the interpreter plays in immigration court.

OPENING THE DOOR TO FORENSIC EVIDENCE TRANSLATIONS; TRANSLITERATION OF AUDIO FILES AND SOCIAL MEDIA CONTENT [ETHICS]

LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE / ADVANCED
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: MARCELA ROMERO-LANGLOIS

The participants will be introduced to transliterations of social media files, audio and digital files, and the challenges encountered in the entire process from accepting a job to being absolutely certain the linguist has the tools and the resources required to render a bilingual script that is accurate and complete.  The participants will learn about software and equipment utilized in the process of transliteration of audio files and how to manipulate the sounds, while insuring that the original sound language file remains unchanged. There will be examples of transcripts and basic formats used to preserve evidence.  There will also be a discussion of ethics and the confidentiality entrusted in the judiciary interpreter not to divulge any of the content of the evidence with anyone; where to go if questions do come up; what happens when the linguist encounters challenges in these delicate assignments;  how to manage and bundle multiple scripts; how to educate clients before accepting the assignment, so the clients know and understand the difference between a translation and a transliteration  job; how much time each recorded file will take to review, edit, and transcribe in the source language, and then translate and edit, and transcribe into the format in the source language, and proofing time required, and when a certificate of transliteration / translation is required for a trial; and in the conversion of media files, how to insure the linguist bills enough for the time spent cleaning and converting files into working platforms for translation.

Objectives:  Attendees will understand and be able to handle digital files, privacy and security; conversion into working platforms; software for audio augmentation; equipment; time requirements; transcription of multilingual script; options for formatting and asses the value of the time involved.

Saturday, May 18th, 2019

2:45 PM – 3:45 PM

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change

ARE YOU IN CONTROL OR IS STRESS? [ETHICS]

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: OLGA SHOSTACHUCK

Stress and the effects of trauma appear in a broad spectrum of professions and can occur in practically any career. Working with people who have survived trauma carries a risk of secondary trauma and burnout for the service provider and other individuals involved, namely, the interpreter. In this interactive session, the presenter will analyze several theoretical approaches pertaining to occupational health in the interpreting field, and discuss how these approaches can be applied as a holistic framework which guides interpreters in their development of ethical and effective decision-making skills. The participants will also examine negative and positive experiences and consequences of working with survivors of trauma. They will analyze some ethical questions that arise as part of complex emotional and psychological demands, and they will learn how to mitigate barriers and manage conflicts in an aesthetically pleasing, highly user-friendly manner. Self-care practices for interpreters to limit or prevent the exposure will be examined, and a comprehensive and coherent self-care plan for engaging in reflective interpreting practice will be developed. The session is presented in English.

Objectives: In this session, attendees will learn specific techniques, strategies and self-care practices unique to providing interpretation and translation services for victims and survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, torture, human trafficking and other acts of violence.

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES COURTS (AOUSC) UPDATE

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
PRESENTER: JAVIER SOLER

Join a representative from the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts to discuss recent updates and engage in a question and answer session.

THE INTERPRETER'S MISTAKE: RECONCILING PRIDE WITH HUMILITY [ETHICS]

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: ATHENA MATILKSY

Ethical standards demand the performance of accurate interpretations and speaking up when obstacles to interpretations are encountered. But how many interpreters understand how to effectively intervene when required? Furthermore, how can one correct one’s interpretations in a way that upholds ethical standards but does not undermine work as a professional? This workshop will cover how to conduct effective interventions while not allowing one’s sense of self as an interpreter to be damaged, or one’s reputation to be tarnished. Participants will engage in role play to practice intervening, and they will leave better equipped to make use of such interventions in real life.

Objectives: Participants will learn the importance of correcting mistakes on the record, and how to do so while maintaining ethical standards and professionalism.

PROFESSION AND INDUSTRY

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
MODERATOR: ARMANDO EZQUERRA HASBUN

TBD

FORENSIC LINGUISTICS & COURT INTERPRETING

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: SPANISH
PRESENTER: DARINA MANGINO

In this session interpreters will be introduced to the field of forensic linguistics and the findings that can enhance a court interpreter´s understanding of the complex dynamics of having two languages coexisting during proceedings. The role of the interpreter will be analyzed through the lens of this discipline. Examples will highlight the benefits of anticipating the patterns in the way participants (attorneys, witnesses, police officers, expert witnesses, judges, court clerks) are bound by procedures to present information before the court.

Saturday, May 18th, 2019

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change

DEFENDING YOUR FORENSIC TRANSCRIPTION TRANSLATION (FTT): EXPERT WITNESS TIPS

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: JUDITH KENIGSON KRISTY

You produced an FTT (Forensic Transcription Translation) a year ago and it was well received, but now… OMG…, you just got “the call” – you know, the one where they want you to appear as an expert witness to defend it at trial! What to do?  Here’s a presentation and discussion of specific challenges you’ll want to know about in order to “bullet-proof” your FTT expert testimony so that it stands up to adversarial scrutiny.

THOSE PESKY ABBREVIATIONS

LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH W/ SPANISH EXAMPLES
PRESENTER: VINKA VALDIVIA

The interpreter has passed the exam and can now start working in the courtroom, but is thrust into a world where abbreviations and shortened phrases are thrown about like they’re common phrases. Even experienced interpreters who work primarily in settings outside the courtroom, such as depositions, or who don’t work in more than one courtroom setting, may be thrown off by the casual way attorneys and judges use abbreviations with which they are unfamiliar. What’s the difference between an FSC, USC, and TRC? What is meant by “any legal cause?” What does 977 refer to? What are the various waivers in sentencing? Where are DP and DQ used? These are just some examples of abbreviations or shortened phrases that may trip up an interpreter if they are unfamiliar with the meanings, because interpreters cannot interpret what they don’t understand. This session will provide a robust list of these terms and shortened phrases in English with definitions, as well as the contexts in which they are used, so that the interpreter is well-prepared to let them slip off the tongue as easily as they do from other courtroom officers. The list will be provided in English with definitions and discussion of translations, mostly for Spanish.

Objectives: To provide common and some uncommon abbreviations and shortened phrases that are thrown about every day in the courtroom, and that may catch interpreters off guard.

TRANSLATING LATIN AMERICAN CASE LAW FROM SPANISH TO ENGLISH

LEVEL: ADVANCED
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH W/ SPANISH EXAMPLES
PRESENTER: MADELINE RIOS

This presentation will review the special challenges involved in translating Latin American Case Law into English. Topics will include philosophical differences between the Civil and Common Law legal traditions that affect how case law is written, the concepts of jurisprudencia and doctrina, the structure of case law documents, the need for knowledge of procedural aspects, challenging phrases particular to case law translation, stylistic differences between Spanish and English that affect case law translation, and research techniques. The presentation will be in English, using examples from Spanish case law.

Objectives: Attendees will become familiar with philosophical differences between the Civil and Common Law legal traditions.

ADVOCATING FOR COURT INTERPRETER WAGE POLICIES BASED ON OBJECTIVE CRITERIA

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
PRESENTERS: MARY LOU ARANGUREN AND SANDRO TOMASI

How can professional court interpreters explain the difficulty of their work to monolinguals, even many bilinguals, who believe that interpreting is “just” repeating whatever was said in another language? Court interpreters know how hard interpreting in courtrooms can be because they have lived through it. While many strides have been made over the last 20 years to improve language-access services in the courts, most court administrators continue to undervalue the knowledge, skills and abilities of court interpreters. This seminar will analyze objective criteria regarding the job of a court interpreter and review some of the judicial policies that have increased salaries thereof.

Objectives: Inform court interpreters and court administrators of the latest policy trends regarding court interpreter salaries.

FAITES ENTRER L'ACCUSÉ / BRING IN THE DEFENDANT

LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
LANGUAGE: FRENCH
PRESENTER: GLADYS MATTHEWS, PHD

Witness testimony, including specialized terminology, of course, but also everyday language expressions, pose a wide array of challenges.  Using excerpts from the French television series, Faites entrer l’accusé, this session will analyze examples of challenging language used by victims, family members, psychologists, lawyers, and others involved in a criminal case. Special attention will be given to terminology related to criminal acts such as kidnapping, assault, rape, and murder (e.g. acte ignoble/heinous crime), as well as expressions describing mental states or feelings (e.g. effondré/devastated, brutalité/viciousness, and acharnement/fury). This session will also analyze idiomatic expressions such as du coup, être carré, faire quelque chose à l’emporte-pièce, etc., and propose equivalents in English. An intermediate to advanced level of French is desirable.

Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be familiar with a number of challenging everyday language and specialized terms frequently used during witness testimony proceedings.

Sunday, May 19th, 2019

8:00 AM – 8:45 AM

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change

TOWN HALL

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
PANELISTS: THE NAJIT BOARD OF DIRECTORS
MODERATOR: AIMEE BENAVIDES, NAJIT CHAIR

Join the NAJIT Board and key committee chairs to discuss NAJIT and issues within the profession.

Sunday, May 19th, 2019

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change

INVESTIGATIVE INTERVIEWS AND DYNAMIC INTERPRETING [ETHICS]

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: DAVID GILBERT, PHD

The session provides attendees with an overview of the Reid and PEACE methods of investigative interviewing used by law enforcement and national security agencies. It explains the implications these techniques have for interpreters when engaged to mediate investigative interviews. Examples will be provided where conventional interpreting approaches are inappropriate, and which may give rise to circumstances where ethics of the profession are compromised. Methods and approaches to planning and applying interpreting skills in investigative interviews will be discussed. Attendees will have an opportunity to observe and participate in a practical demonstration.

Objectives: Upon completion of the proposed session, attendees will be able to explain the difference between two key types of investigative interviewing techniques used by law enforcement and national security agencies (PEACE and Reid techniques). They will be able to identify key implications investigative interviewing techniques have on the role of the interpreter. Attendees will learn how to prepare to interpret for an investigative interview, apply appropriate interpreting techniques in an investigative interviewing scenario, and have an opportunity to observe/participate in an investigative interviewing scenario mediated by an interpreter.

INTERPRETER OR EXPERT WITNESS? ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS [ETHICS]

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: ERNEST NIÑO-MURCIA

While court interpreters possess relevant expertise in certain areas, actually rendering an expert opinion as a witness poses ethical challenges. This session will explore different situations in which an interpreter could be asked to render an expert opinion, while discussing the ethical challenges involved (including scope of practice and conflict of interest), and the reasons certain expert work may or may not be appropriate.

Objectives: Attendees will be able to articulate and analyze the ethical issues involved in considering possible expert witness work (and completing it if appropriate).

THE HISTORY OF NAJIT

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
PRESENTER: JANIS PALMA

TBD

BEST PRACTICES IN CONFERENCE INTERPRETING: WHAT EVERY COURT INTERPRETER NEEDS TO KNOW [ETHICS]

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: KATTY KAUFFMAN

How many interpreters have ever thought about making the leap onto the conference circuit? And then are worried that they won’t know what’s expected? They may be confident about their command of the simultaneous mode, but how does a conference differ from court? Had similar questions? Then attend this session! The speaker, a seasoned court and conference interpreter, will review best practices before, during and after a conference interpreting assignment and provide tips designed specifically to help experienced court interpreters make the transition smoothly. This session is especially geared toward colleagues with languages other than Spanish.

WHEN INTERPRETATION OF THE WORDS JUST ISN’T ENOUGH: HOW MEDICAL INTERPRETATION STANDARDS CAN SHED NEW LIGHT ON ETHICS FOR COURT INTERPRETATION [ETHIC]

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTERS: JOHANNA PARKER AND ELLEN WINGO

Interpret everything. Add nothing. Omit nothing. Remain neutral. The role of the court interpreter is narrowly defined by codes of ethics: to level the playing field between English speakers and non-English speakers in the legal setting.  But every interpreter has had this experience: despite the completely accurate interpretation of a message, two parties understand two very different things because they come from different cultural backgrounds. Is the playing field really level when the cultural divide can be wider than the language one? In healthcare, an interpreter can bring the speaker’s attention to the misunderstanding, but in the legal setting, the interpreter may feel stuck in the middle, aware of the disconnect, but bound by ethics not to intervene. In this session, the presenters will review standards of practice followed by healthcare interpreters that allow them to intervene to offer clarification. They will also share the results of a survey of medical and legal interpreters on how they apply — and sometimes bend — their codes of ethics, stepping outside the role of strict interpretation to further communication between the parties. Participants will engage in an open discussion based on scenarios of different ethical dilemmas in order to examine whether there is a place in court interpreter ethics for intervention.

Objectives: Participants will be able to review healthcare interpreter standards of practice related to interventions to offer clarification and consider their applicability in the legal setting.  They will be able to reflect on their own conduct, as well as that of colleagues as shared through a survey of medical and court interpreters. They will analyze ethical dilemmas and discuss if an incremental intervention model could be incorporated into court interpreter ethics.

Sunday, May 19th, 2019

10:30 AM – Noon

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change

CALL FOR HELP: LEGAL INTERPRETATION IN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES IN THE UNITED STATES

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
PRESENTERS: GEORGANNE WELLER, PHD

In the United States there is growing concern about the difficulties in finding qualified legal interpreters in the indigenous languages of Mexico and Guatemala to provide equal access to justice for the speakers of these languages. Participants will be in a better position to understand the interpreter´s role in the communication network, the importance of moving from social to professional bilingualism, the pros and cons of linguistic diversity, the inseparability of language and culture, among other theoretical considerations, as well as the social and political issues behind this shortage.  It offers possible training and materials to remedy the present situation from real life experiences in Mexico and in Florida.

Objectives Participants will be able to understand the social and political issues behind this shortage and be aware of possible training and materials available to remedy the present situation.

FROM THE STAGE TO THE STAND: ACTING TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR INTERPRETATION

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: LANGUAGE NEUTRAL
PRESENTER: JAVIER CASTILLO

Learn skills and techniques used by actors and improvisers that can help you become a better interpreter. Actors control their voice, inflection, and emotions. Improvisers think quickly on their feet, create and embody characters and situations and place ultimate trust in their teammates. While used for different purposes, these skills are key to being an excellent interpreter. Join this engaging session and explore how voice control, stage (stand) presence, and remaining cool under pressure assist interpreters to better their craft. There will be practice in thinking on one’s feet, coming up with creative solutions, and presenting emotive interpretation.  This session should be used to become a better interpreter and have fun doing so.

SERVING FOOD, SERVING NOTICE, SERVING TIME: NAVIGATING CHANGES OF MEANING IN THE JUDICIAL CONTEXT

LEVEL: BEGINNER / INTERMEDIATE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH AND SPANISH
PRESENTER: CYNTHIA LEPELEY, PHD

Many common words in English have a completely different meaning and different target language equivalent–when used in a legal context in the United States. For example, vacating the premises is very different from vacating an order, noticing something is not the same as taking judicial notice, and religious convictions are quite different from criminal convictions. For this reason, court interpreters must master not only the everyday speech of their source and target languages, but also the ways in which words may acquire radically different meanings when applied to a legal setting. This session will focus on 50 common English words that have a very different meaning when used in a legal setting. Participants will (1) learn the meaning of these words when used in a legal context in the United States and (2) prepare an English-Spanish glossary of them. By the end of the session, participants will be well equipped to avoid mistakes in their renditions of these terms.

THE PROFESSIONALIZATION OF OUR PROFESSION: GETTING THE RESPECT WE DESERVE [ETHICS]

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
PRESENTER: JUDY JENNER

It is very much in the interest of every linguist and the profession at large if it is better understood by the general public, if it is better paid and more respected. Language professionals oftentimes think that the outside world does not perceive them as the proper professionals that they are, but here’s some tough love: some of this might be the professional’s own fault. This is a discussion of what can be done to earn the place professional linguists deserve–and about the things language professionals, in aggregate, have not always done well in the past. Professional respect and high rates are earned and not bestowed on anyone, and all should work together to increase the importance of language services in clients’ minds. The speaker will share effective techniques that all can use to take the profession to the next level. Spoiler alert: raising the profession’s image requires a bit of hard work for everyone, but should reap great rewards. The speaker will address why language professionals are often their own worst enemies, what women can learn from men in terms of assertiveness, how to deal with critical and timely issues such as sexual harassment, and about the boundaries of ethics.

Objectives: Attendees will learn what can be done to earn the respect deserved as a profession. Attendees will be provided food for thought about how individual behavior and business practices affect the profession and how it can be changed from within rather than hoping that the outside world will show respect on their own.

LEARN FROM THE EXPERTS!

LEVEL: ALL
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH
PANELISTS: TBD
MODERATOR: ARMANDO EZQUERRA HASBUN

This is a chance to listen to some of the presenters at the conference as they expound on their views on topics of interest to the profession and to the industry. They can also provide their insights on technical, ethical and protocol issues, examinations and credentials and how to best navigate one’s own advancement in the field. They will take questions from the audience, so the audience will get a second chance to ask them the questions that may not have been asked during their scheduled presentations. This will be a panel with a moderator, divided into two segments.

Objectives:  Participants will be able to ask questions about technique, protocol and ethics discussed and answered by notable presenters at this year’s conference, including personalized in-depth answers to questions which have not been discussed during the regular sessions; participants will receive updates about the current state of the profession and of the industry.