Main Conference Schedule: Saturday, May 18 & Sunday, May 19

Our sessions provide you with a multitude of educational options to learn new skills, expand your knowledge, and participate in discussions on current issues within the interpreting and translation professions. You will find a vast array of session options covering all levels of expertise.

All Saturday and Sunday sessions are open seating. You do not need to select your main conference sessions in advance. Continuing education credits are currently being submitted for approval. Check our CEU page for regular updates. NOTE: Sessions are subject to change.

All presenter biographies can be found here.

 

Saturday, May 18, 2024

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

THE INTERPRETER AS EXPERT WITNESS: WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU ARE CALLED IN TO TESTIFY AS AN EXPERT

Presenter: Janis Palma
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Saturday, May 18, 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Session DescriptionWhen an interpreter is asked to testify about their work product, the party seeking their testimony will seldom be clear about what is expected of them, what questions will be asked, what sort of cross-examination to expect. This presentation will go over the basic requirements to qualify an expert witness under the current Daubert standards as they would apply to an interpreter’s work product, which could include a written translation or a transcript and translation of audio or audiovisual material. Attendees will be invited to share their experiences and clarify doubts about this particular aspect of a judiciary interpreter’s work.

Objectives: At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to 1- Recognize the qualifications of an expert witness under the Daubert standards. 2- Evaluate their own qualifications as experts and areas that they need to work on. 3- Identify the direct and cross-examination questions they may be asked as expert witnesses and some of the best strategies to answer them.

YOU AND AI: A BRIGHT FUTURE FOR FORENSIC TRANSCRIPTION/TRANSLATION [ETHICS]

Presenter: Dr. Dave Gilbert
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Saturday, May 18, 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Session Description: Interpreters and translators need to rise with AI in the interests of justice. There is a real danger of unfair prejudice to accused persons should the courts accept that AI can provide accurate translations, noting that AI has severe limitations due to the complexities and nuances of language. This session explains the critical role interpreters and translators can play as moderators of AI generated translations when presented as evidence in court. Accepting that AI generated translations will inevitably find their way into the courtroom, this session emphasizes that the rise of AI does not necessarily mean the demise of T&I in the justice system. This is particularly the case in the specialized area of forensic transcription/translation where examples of AI generated translations will be analyzed and critiqued.

Objectives: Attendees will gain an understanding of how Artificial Intelligence (AI) is expected to disrupt current practices and procedures relating to forensic transcription/translation (FTT). Learning objectives include gaining an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of AI generated translated intercept evidence and associated ethical implications. Attendees will also obtain an understanding of basic legal concepts that underpin evidence in the form of FTT. This session will equip attendees with the knowledge necessary to negotiate and manage their professional careers within the justice system so that they rise with future developments in AI generated translations.

IS THIS CHAIR TAKEN? WEIGHING SEATING OPTIONS FOR TEAM CONSECUTIVE INTERPRETING IN THE COURTS [ETHICS]

Presenter: Ernest Niño-Murcia
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Saturday, May 18, 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Session Description: There is much more to deciding where you and your partner will sit while you interpret witness testimony than finding the most comfortable chair. The conventional choices are straightforward: one interpreter can be with the witness at the stand while one stays back at the counsel table, or both interpreters can be up at the witness stand. But what are each configuration’s relative advantages and disadvantages that must be weighed to decide? Are there other possible seating arrangements? How do you manage when The Court gives you no choice in the matter? The seemingly mundane matter of where team interpreters will be placed in the courtroom touches on ethics, self-advocacy, and technology, among others. Participants will discuss and debate these issues while reflecting on their own experiences.

Objectives: Participants will be able to identify various seating arrangements for team interpreters working on witness testimony, including each configuration’s relative advantages and disadvantages and how to discuss the issue with parties and the court.

MASTERING RESILIENCE: NAVIGATING STRESS IN DEPOSITION INTERPRETING

Presenters: Tianlu Jia Redmon
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Saturday, May 18, 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

This session delves into the unique challenges remote deposition interpreters face in high-pressure environments. It emphasizes the importance of mental and emotional resilience, offering practical strategies for managing stress effectively. The presentation will explore the psychological impact of interpreting in remote depositions, where accuracy and impartiality are paramount, yet emotional and mental stressors are prevalent. The session will showcase evidence-based techniques, including mindfulness practices, cognitive-behavioral approaches, and physical wellness strategies specifically tailored to the interpreting profession. Attendees will learn to recognize early signs of stress and burnout and implement coping mechanisms that enhance focus, emotional balance, and overall well-being. Through expert insights, case studies, and interactive exercises, participants will better understand stress dynamics in legal interpreting. They will leave equipped with a toolkit of techniques to maintain high professional standards while safeguarding their mental health. This session is designed for legal interpreters at all levels of experience. While the session will focus on interpreting remote depositions, participants may find the same skills valuable regardless of the setting. By the end of this session, participants will be better prepared to face the demands of their roles with renewed confidence and resilience.

Objectives: In this session, attendees will develop a comprehensive understanding of the stress factors unique to remote deposition interpreting. The primary objective is to equip participants with effective, evidence-based strategies to manage stress, enhancing their professional performance and personal well-being. Participants will gain insights into the psychological impacts of high-pressure legal environments and learn to identify early signs of stress and burnout. The session aims to provide a toolkit of practical techniques, including mindfulness practices, cognitive-behavioral approaches, and physical wellness strategies, tailored specifically for interpreters. Another key objective is to foster a deeper appreciation of the importance of mental and emotional resilience in maintaining accuracy and impartiality in legal settings. Attendees will leave the session empowered with skills to implement these coping mechanisms in their daily professional lives. The same skills may be applied to other high-pressure interpretation settings.

10:30 AM – NOON

PROTECTING THE COURTROOM RECORD: THE INTERPRETER’S ROLE IN THE COURTROOM (A JUDGE’S VIEWPOINT) [ETHICS]

Presenters: Honorable Jose Salinas and Manpreet Kaur
Language: English
Level: All Levels
Saturday, May 18, 10:30 AM – Noon EDT

Session Description: The Panel discussion will center around what is the role of an interpreter in the courtroom as viewed by the judicial officer.  (can also add the view from a prosecutor and defense attorney if they are part of the panel).

Objectives: At the end of the session, it is hoped that interpreters will get an understanding of how a judge (and prosecutor and defense attorney) sees the interpreter’s function within the courtroom. It is hoped to look at all aspects of the interpret role in a courtroom during a hearing.

LANGUAGE AND CULTURE: UNDERSTANDING U.S. SPORTS IDIOMS

Presenter: Javier Castillo
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Saturday, May 18, 10:30 AM – Noon EDT

Session Description: This workshop is designed for T&I professionals of all levels. Whether you’re new and starting your freelance career or a veteran-staffer-turned-solopreneur, knowing how to price your services according to your income goals, manage your business expenses, keep track of what’s coming in and going out so that you don’t come up short at tax time, and knowing what tools and approaches exist to help you market your growing business are essential skills that every T&I professional needs.

WITNESS MANAGEMENT: TIPS AND BEST PRACTICES FOR CONSECUTIVE INTERPRETATION OF WITNESS TESTIMONY

Presenter: Ellen Wingo
Language: Language Neutral
Level: Intermediate/Advanced
Saturday, May 18, 10:30 AM – Noon EDT

Session Description: Court interpreters are never more front and center than when interpreting witness testimony. When they change from a voice in the background to being the voice everyone hears, the job of the interpreter becomes much more involved than simply transferring a message from one language to another. This session is not intended to teach consecutive interpretation or note-taking. Rather, it is designed for intermediate and advanced interpreters who want to delve deep into all of the other factors involved in interpreting for a witness on the stand. Participants will examine how their physical presence has an impact on the witness, the parties, and the court in general. They will learn and practice how to train parties to pause at regular intervals using verbal and nonverbal cues to regulate the rhythm of speech and interpretation. They will discuss best practices for how and when to interrupt a witness, as well as when not to, and when a “strategic interruption” can be best applied. This workshop is language neutral, open to those looking to gain confidence in managing witness testimony.

Objectives: Participants in this session will analyze the non-linguistic factors involved in interpreting for witnesses on the stand. They will examine the impact their physical presence can have in the courtroom. They will practice verbal and non-verbal techniques for regulating the flow of speech and interpreted segments, and to train speakers to pause at regular intervals. Attendees will discuss best practices for how and when to interrupt, as well as when not to. They will learn about “strategic interruptions” and when they can be best applied.

MENTORING THE FUTURE: SUPPORTING INTERPRETERS IN PREPARING FOR THE STATE WRITTEN EXAM AND ORAL PROFICIENCY INTERVIEW [ETHICS]

Presenter: Judith Costello
Language: Language Neutral
Level: Advanced
Saturday, May 18, 10:30 AM – Noon EDT

Session Description: Many state courts face a paucity of trained and certified interpreters, particularly for languages other than Spanish. Rural courts struggle with the lack of availability of qualified interpreters. Court interpreter training is limited in availability and can present a daunting price tag to the beginning interpreter. Novice interpreters need guidance and support to develop the skills required to work in all three modes of court interpreting and select quality study materials and training programs. Interpreters in languages of lesser diffusion additionally confront a scarcity of resource materials and very limited training opportunities. Seasoned, certified interpreters are the obvious choice for mentoring and training less experienced colleagues. This presentation will guide interpreter mentors in setting up a local/remote program to train new interpreters in specific skill building for consecutive and simultaneous interpreting and sight translation, as well as instruction in protocols, court processes, court terminology, and usage, sequence of court events, the steps in a jury trial, court interpreter ethics, and vocabulary development.    We will discuss mock exams, study materials, setting up video remote seminars, ethic scenarios, and cooperating with local court interpreter associations.

2:15 PM – 3:15 PM

INTERPRETING GADGETS: A NEW DEVICE FOR NOTE-TAKING

Presenter: Judy Jenner
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Saturday, May 18, 2:15 PM – 3:15 PM

Session Description: Attendees will learn the basic functions of a new piece of hardware they may never have had before and will also be able to use the presenter’s device to test it. Attendees will be made aware of the advantages — as well as limitations — of a digital device that is lightweight and versatile and eliminates the need for paper.

WHAT WOULD WORK BEST FOR ME, BEING A FREELANCER OR AN EMPLOYEE?

Presenter: Heidi Cazes
Language: English
Level: All Levels
Saturday, June 3, 2:15 PM – 3:15 PM

Session Description: Translators and interpreters usually work on their own, as independent entities providing services to different types of clients. As not many permanent positions are available, many individuals do not even consider being an employee as an option. Nevertheless, although scarce, permanent positions do exist in these fields. In many professions, people think about the decision to leave a permanent position and become a freelancer, but in the T&I profession, it might happen in the opposite direction. Before deciding to make a change, it is important to be aware of what being an employee entails. This presentation, given by someone who after a lifetime as a freelancer became a full-time employee for the first time in her life, will look at the different aspects involved and will compare details between being an employee or a freelancer. These include pragmatic matters, such as the difference in working conditions and financial issues, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each. Finally, the presenter will also analyze the intangible aspects to be taken into account when deciding if a change in work status is something one should even contemplate doing.

Objectives: After this presentation, participants will be aware of the different conditions that exist when working as a freelancer or an employee. Participants will be able to compare and contrast the advantages and challenges of working in each situation. Participants will have the tools to make a more informed decision, based on their personal circumstances and temperament, to decide if they want to pursue working as an employee or as a freelancer.

MAKING A DIFFERENCE: HOW TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE PROFESSIONALIZATION OF INTERPRETING

Presenter: Gabriela Siebach
Language: English
Level: All levels
Saturday, May 18, 2:15 PM – 3:15 PM

Session Description: In the United States, each interpreting specialization (such as legal, health care, education, social services, conference, etc.) and each language group (i.e. American Sign Language, Spanish, etc.) have started their own journey towards professionalization, with each subgroup sitting at a different stage. In this presentation, we will explore judicial interpreter practices in different states throughout the US and the general trajectory of professionalization for interpreting and advancement initiatives in particular interpreting subgroups. Participants will also discuss how each individual interpreter and/or translator can contribute to professionalization efforts.

Objectives: Analyze the current state of interpreting professionalization in the United States. Identify two ways in which to increase the visibility of judicial interpreters. Implement one new strategy to contribute to the professionalization of judicial interpreters.

THE USE OF PERSONAL PRONOUNS FOR DIRECT DISCOURSE IN LEGAL SETTINGS WITH INTERPRETATION [ETHICS]

Presenter: Georganne Weller, PhD
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Saturday, May 18, 2:15 PM – 3:15 PM

Session DescriptionWhen interpreting from English into Spanish the interpreter must choose between the formal (usted) form and the informal (tú o vos) form. Veteran interpreters know this and make the choice through instinctive linguistic knowledge of appropriateness in the target language. This presentation will cover address forms as originally set out by Brown and Gilman (1960/1972) and simplified by Fasold (1990) as “The words speakers use to designate the person they are talking to while they are talking to them”. The use of different forms for addressing people is socio-linguistically bound and the way in which people address one another usually depends on their age, sex, social group, and personal relationship, and it varies across languages. This session will refer to the interpreter’s choice of “usted” or “tú” in the English into Spanish language combination. A discussion will follow regarding the choices interpreters make instantly based on certain linguistic grounds as intermediaries in direct discourse between lawyers or judges in court and the defendant or respondent, regarding whether or not the interpreter must always speak in the first person and, if so, does this not lead to more confusion during the discourse than if the third person were used?

Objectives: 1.  Attendees will become aware of the importance of address forms in legal settings with interpretation. 2. Participants will reflect on how they have used address forms in the past in judiciary venues with interpretation. 3. The audience will become sensitive to the affective interpersonal aspects of the interpreter’s choice of address terms in legal settings.

3:45 PM – 5:15 PM

TEAM INTERPRETING IN THE COURTROOM: IMPLEMENTING COLLABORATION AND INTERDEPENDENCE STRATEGIES

Presenters: Chantal Portillo, PhD, and Richard Hall
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Saturday, May 18, 3:45 PM – 5:15 PM

Session Description: This session will be moving away from the on-off interpreter construct, which is somewhat limited to monitoring and avoiding interpreter fatigue, and instead, advancing into something that resembles a partnership when talking about team interpreting in the courts. The book Team Interpreting by Jack Hoza is the foundational resource for this session. It encapsulates the concepts of team interpreting that will be discussed. The presenters will cover how to prepare for an assignment, how to provide support during an assignment, and the benefits of interdependence and collaboration. The overall vision is that using this approach to team interpreting will improve a team’s overall performance, the accuracy and completeness of the record, and will provide the best possible access to justice for limited English proficient court users.

Objectives: The goal of this session is to present a more collaborative approach to team interpreting. During this session, participants will experiment with fundamental skills and techniques designed to enhance the working relationship of team members and to improve the accuracy and completeness of interpretations rendered. By the end of the session, participants will be able to identify the two roles that interpreters assume when teaming and articulate what the responsibilities are for each role. Additionally, participants will be able to explain what makes an effective interpreting team, and practical strategies they can implement to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the interpreting team via a series of pre-session, in-session and post-session discussions.

TO OMIT OR NOT TO OMIT? IT DEPENDS. [ETHICS]

Presenter: Agustín Servín de la Mora and James Plunkett III
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Saturday, May 18, 3:45 PM – 5:15 PM

Session Description: Court interpreters adhere strictly to the notion that “the rendition should sound natural in the target language, and there should be no distortion of the original message through addition or omission, explanation or paraphrasing” (NAJIT Code of Ethics and Professional Responsibility). The presenters will introduce the participants to a deeper look into omissions, guide them with analytical and self-reflective exercises, and propose a plan to know when omitting is necessary while still conserving the message in the target language.

Participants must bring a recording device and headsets. Handouts will be distributed during the workshop.

Objectives: Participants will be prepared to make conscious decisions about omitting elements of a message in the source language as long as the message is accurate, complete and faithful in the target language. During the workshop, participants will learn about the different types of omissions and why they occur. They will interpret in the simultaneous mode utterances heard in court and analyze the impact of target language omissions on accuracy, completeness and faithfulness. They will elaborate strategies and coping tactics to apply at hearings while rendering into the target language using the simultaneous mode.

COURT PROCEEDINGS FOR PORTUGUESE INTERPRETERS

Presenters: Nattalia Paterson, PhD
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Saturday, May 18, 3:45 PM – 5:15 PM

Description: Interpreting in legal settings requires a deep understanding of court proceedings terminology. This workshop will focus on the complexities of the Brazilian and American legal systems, by comparing each jurisdiction’s unique terminology. The presenter will cover basic terminology in civil and criminal proceedings, discussing potential pitfalls and false cognates such as “custody” and “perjury.”  Frequently misunderstood concepts such as “plea bargain” versus “turn state’s evidence,” “probation” versus “parole,” and “promotor” versus “procurador” will be addressed. The presenter will also give some tips on how to research terminology using reliable sources. The presentation will be conducted in English and Portuguese. It will target beginner and intermediate interpreters and offer a refresher to experienced interpreters.

Objectives: Attendees will enhance their comprehension of both the Brazilian and American legal systems. This includes insights into key stakeholders, fundamental legal vocabulary pertaining to civil and criminal procedures, and guidance on conducting terminology research using trusted sources.

THE ETHICS OF COURT INTERPRETING COMPARED WITH CONFERENCE, ESCORT, AND MILITARY INTERPRETING [ETHICS]

Presenters: Lili Selden, PhD and Niery Grace Bardakjian, PhD
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Saturday, May 18, 3:45 PM – 5:15 PM

Session Description: This presentation will primarily serve as a refresher on the NAJIT Code of Court Interpreter Ethics and Professional Responsibility. The Code is designed to guide court interpreters in their daily conduct and protect them from potentially sticky legal situations, but as will be discussed interpreters are routinely placed in ambiguous situations in which they must pause to think about how to adhere to the Code without offending judges, attorneys, and other parties. The co-presenters will also touch on how the NAJIT Code is a departure from the Codes upheld by conference, escort, and military interpreters. Finally, a number of scenarios will be presented in which attendees are asked to brainstorm regarding potential solutions to ethical challenges that court interpreters have encountered.

Objectives: Attendees will review the NAJIT Code of Court Interpreter Ethics and Professional Responsibility, as it is the cornerstone of the profession and interpreters must be vigilant about ensuring that they conduct themselves so as not to risk harming the integrity of court proceedings. In order to engage fully with the rationale behind each of the canons, the attendees will also be introduced to (or reminded about) the ethical tenets of conference, escort, and military interpreters. Finally, by collectively sharing possible solutions to the ethical challenges routinely faced by interpreters in court, attendees will leave the workshop with increased confidence in their individual ability to address such challenges.

Sunday, May 19, 2024

8:00 AM – 8:45 AM

NAJIT TOWN HALL

Level: All Levels
Language: English
Panelists: The NAJIT Board of Directors

Join the NAJIT Board and key committee chairs to discuss NAJIT and issues within the profession.

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

ASK NOT WHAT YOUR ASSOCIATION CAN DO FOR YOU BUT WHAT YOU CAN DO FOR YOUR ASSOCIATION!

Presenter: Nattalia Paterson, PhD
Language: English
Level: All Levels
Sunday, May 19, 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Session Description: Attendees will learn about the role of professional associations. They will also learn about the importance of volunteering, the factors that compel some people to volunteer, and those that make them shy away from it. Finally, attendees will learn about volunteer opportunities at NAJIT.

Objectives: Professional associations play a critical role in representing and supporting the interests of professionals in a particular field. These organizations bring together individuals who share common interests, goals, and concerns related to their profession, and often serve as networking, education, collaboration, and advocacy hubs. In this talk, the presenter will examine the essential role played by translation and interpretation associations and highlight the valuable resources and opportunities they provide for their members to enhance their skills, knowledge, and careers. Particular emphasis will be placed on the importance of volunteering in a professional association, with a focus on volunteering opportunities at NAJIT.

RESILIENCE IN INTERPRETING

Presenter: Eliane Sfeir-Markus
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Sunday, May 19, 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Session DescriptionWhile everyone is preparing and talking about the advent of Artificial Intelligence and its impact on the interpreting industry, interpreters cannot help but worry and fear for their livelihood. In addition, the work of a court interpreter requires accuracy, tenacity, and emotional strength. As with anyone working in the court setting, interpreters will face work-related stress. This presentation sheds light on the emotional toll that court interpreters face every day. This presentation provides the audience with practical coping mechanisms tailored specifically for court interpreters. Ultimately, this presentation aims to foster resilience in the face of change and empower court interpreters with tools to manage vicarious trauma and stress.

Objectives: During this presentation, attendees will learn the difference between vicarious trauma, compassion fatigue, burn- out, and stress. Attendees will take two tests: one that will test their compassion fatigue level, and one to check the balance in their life. They will then learn to plan a self-care routine that will improve the results of these tests. Also, attendees will be able to plan and strategize how to face stress in the face of change in the industry, particularly with regard to Artificial Intelligence.

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES COURTS (AOUSC) UPDATE

Presenter: Javier Soler
Language: English
Level: All Levels
Sunday, May 19, 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Session DescriptionJoin a representative from the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts to discuss recent updates and engage in a question and answer session.

ACHIEVING LANGUAGE ACCESS FOR ALL: RAISING STANDARDS FOR INTERPRETERS OF ALL LANGUAGES THROUGH A LANGUAGE-NEUTRAL INTERPRETER SKILLS EXAM

Presenter: Johanna Parker
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Sunday, May 19, 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Session Description: Every Limited English Proficient person has a right to high-quality interpretation in legal, medical, and other settings. It’s a matter of justice. Unfortunately, exams and certifications designed to ensure the quality of interpreters they can access are only offered in a handful of languages. So what about the rest? Organizations that hire interpreters have had to rely on self-reported qualifications or tests that only focus on English proficiency, ethics, and specialized terminology for so long. But what ensures they actually know how to interpret? Practically speaking, creating an oral exam for every language that requires interpretation will never be possible. Fortunately, groundbreaking research by the Certification Commission for Healthcare Interpreters (CCHI) has identified the core interpreting subskills that can be evaluated in an English-to-English exam. The CCHI study showed that exam candidates who performed well on an assessment of these core subskills would also pass the CHI language-specific interpreting exam. This means that CCHI is on the vanguard of interpreter certification with performance exams for interpreters of any language. Those who pass the English-to-English exam and fulfill other requirements can earn the new CoreCHI-Performance certification. Court administrators, working court interpreters in languages of lesser diffusion, and anyone who cares about language access can all benefit from learning about this new interpretation assessment tool. All are welcome to this workshop for a lively discussion on how it can help raise the standards of the interpreting profession and achieve true language equity for speakers of all languages.

Objectives: In this session, attendees will learn about the novel CCHI study that determined that interpreting subskills can be tested in an English-to-English format and about the new certification developed by CCHI based on these study results. They will deepen their understanding of these subskills and how they relate to the interpreting process. They will also discuss the impact that this study and the new certification for healthcare interpreters could have on our profession across all settings, revolutionizing training for interpreters of languages of lesser diffusion (LLD), raising standards for interpreters of these languages, and ensuring language access for all Limited English Proficient individuals.

10:30 AM – NOON

DON'T AGONIZE, ORGANIZE! -- EXPERIENCES IN ADVOCACY

Panelists: Genevieve Howe, Katty Kauffman, Esperanza Lopez-Dominguez, Kelly Varguez
Moderator: Garrett M. Bradford
Language: English
Level: All Levels
Sunday, May 19, 10:30 AM – Noon

Session Description: In this collaborative panel discussion, the topic of advocacy will be front and center. Panelists will share what has and hasn’t worked for them in their endeavors to obtain better rates for interpreters in their areas. Attendees will hear diverse perspectives, including staff interpreters, independent contractors, non-union negotiators, and residents of small states and densely populated areas. After hearing first-hand about the experiences of interpreter advocates on the front lines, attendees will gain insight into how to reinvigorate, continue, or launch advocacy efforts in their regions.

Objectives: This panel discussion will explore different stories of advocacy by court interpreters at the state and federal levels. Panelists will answer questions from the moderator and the audience. Participants will obtain ideas on what to do and what not to do as they contemplate advocacy efforts in their communities.

HABITS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE NOTETAKERS

Presenter: Ernest Niño-Murcia
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels

Sunday, May 19, 10:30 AM – Noon

Session Description: Having a reliable note-taking system is key to interpreting effectively in the consecutive mode. That said, what works for one person may not make sense to another. Because note-taking is as individual as handwriting, it is best for interpreters to work on creating their own system of notes that combines basic elements such as letters, symbols and spacing. The goal of this session is to expose participants to actual examples of good note-taking technique while offering opportunities for practice to identify and perfect their individual note-taking style.

Objectives: Participants will be able to identify best practices for consecutive note-taking and practice them hands-on.

OBJECTION, YOUR HONOR! WHAT CONSTITUTES EVIDENCE IN A COURT PROCEEDING

Presenter: Tony Rosado
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Sunday, May 19, 10:30 AM – Noon

Session DescriptionTo provide a professional service, it is essential court interpreters understand what they are interpreting. A legal proceeding is a complex subject that follows many substantive and procedural rules. A good interpreter must understand what attorneys are trying to accomplish during a trial or evidentiary hearing, and for that, they need to be familiar with all objections. This language neutral presentation will deal with the most common objections raised during criminal and civil matters. The instructor will explain, analyze, and give examples of those objections interpreters are likely to find in a procedure. Those attending will learn, among others, what a “hearsay” objection is, why it is raised, the exceptions to the rule, and some practical applications. Interpreters coming to this presentation will see why lawyers offer evidence not for the truth of the matter in question, why suggestive questions are illegal, and many more concepts that will make them the interpreter attorneys want to hire.

Objectives: During this presentation interpreters will acquire basic procedural law concepts, including a good understanding of what objections are for, when they can be raised and by whom, as well as the purpose of each one of them. By understanding not only the terminology, but the reach of an objection, interpreters will gain a better comprehension of the court proceeding and the party’s strategy. This will make those attending this presentation better interpreters because only when you understand a concept in the source language, can you truly interpret it into the target language.

DNA TESTING AND CHAIN OF CUSTODY [ETHICS]

Presenter: Victor & Miriam Tellez
Language: Language Neutral
Level: All Levels
Sunday, May 19, 10:30 AM – Noon

Session DescriptionChain of custody DNA test is a type of DNA test that ensures the identity and integrity of the DNA samples being tested. It is used for legal purposes, such as misdemeanors and felonies, relates to sexual abuse, paternity, or immigration cases, and requires a third party that has no connection with any of the individuals involved to collect and control the samples. Chain of custody DNA test tracks the whereabouts of the samples from the moment they are collected to the final delivery of results. You will learn how long it takes to complete the test. How accurate the results are.

Objectives: Explain in detail the process of DNA analysis. Step by step. From taking a swab to getting the final results.